Knowing Where You're Going

One of the hardest things in any project is to figure out exactly what you're trying to accomplish. This template is intended to help software development teams do that by forcing them to state what problem they're trying to solve, who it affects, and why their solution is a good one. It is taken from:
Gary Pollice, Liz Augustine, Chris Lowe, and Jas Madhur: Software Development for Small Teams: A RUP-Centric Approach. Addison-Wesley, 2003, 0321199502.
The bits on the left, on gray, are boilerplate; the bits on the right, on white, are to be replaced with something project-specific. I will post again in two weeks once students' vision statements are on the web.

The Problem

The problem of developing software in a predictable and reliable manner
affects the management of software projects. Specifically, developers are not able to predict reliably how long it takes them to perform development tasks with acceptable quality, which makes it impossible to effectively plan a project.
The impact is that users and managers are never sure whether the produced software will meet its requirements, how reliable the software will be, or whether the software will be delivered on time.
A successful solution would be for developers to become more self-aware of what they do (i.e. the process they actually follow), how they spend their time, and the kinds of defects they find in their work.

The Solution

For software development teams
who need to better understand how and when defects are introduced into their products,
our product is a tool for gathering and reporting performance metrics
that helps developers track and analyze personal software development metrics.
Unlike the alternative of failing to gather data, or trying to gather it manually,
our approach helps users gather data unobtrusively, and provides objective feedback that allows them to improve both individual and team performance.
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