For the past few years, Jon Udell has been working on a project called ElmCity. Its ostensible aim is to do for calendars what the RSS ecosystem has done for news: allow everyone to be an author, but also make it easy to aggregate, filter, and share information from a wide variety of sources. Its deeper aim, though, is to teach people by example that this is what the web is for—that it's a way to re-mix information to meet your needs, when and how you want.

After several false starts, ElmCity now has an aggregated calendar for the city of Toronto that combines data in real time from a bunch of sources. If you want your own events to show up, you don't send Jon entries for its database, because it doesn't have one. Instead, you give him the URL for your event feed, so that whenever you add something new, it'll show up automatically. That's how to think like the web, and if we're going to teach kids anything about computing in grade school, that ought to be part of it.

Note: if you'd like to help ElmCity grow, please contact Jon: he's always looking for new curators.